df

Report filesystem disk space usage, with no arguments, `df' reports the space used and available on all currently mounted filesystems (of all types). Otherwise, `df' reports on the filesystem containing each argument FILE.

SYNTAX
     df [OPTION]... [FILE]...

Normally the disk space is printed in units of 1024 bytes, but this
can be overridden.

OPTIONS

`-a'
`--all'
     Include in the listing filesystems that have a size of 0 blocks,
     which are omitted by default.  Such filesystems are typically
     special-purpose pseudo-filesystems, such as automounter entries.
     Also, filesystems of type "ignore" or "auto", supported by some
     operating systems, are only included if this option is specified.

`-h'
`--human-readable'
     Append a size letter such as `M' for megabytes to each size.
     Powers of 1024 are used, not 1000; `M' stands for 1,048,576 bytes.
     Use the `-H' or `--si' option if you prefer powers of 1000.

`-H'
`--si'
     Append a size letter such as `M' for megabytes to each size.  (SI
     is the International System of Units, which defines these letters
     as prefixes.)  Powers of 1000 are used, not 1024; `M' stands for
     1,000,000 bytes.  Use the `-h' or `--human-readable' option if you
     prefer powers of 1024.

`-i'
`--inodes'
     List inode usage information instead of block usage.  An inode
     (short for index node) is contains information about a file such
     as its owner, permissions, timestamps, and location on the disk.

`-k'
`--kilobytes'
     Print sizes in 1024-byte blocks, overriding the default block size.

`-l'
`--local'
     Limit the listing to local filesystems.  By default, remote
     filesystems are also listed.

`-m'
`--megabytes'
     Print sizes in megabyte (that is, 1,048,576-byte) blocks.

`--no-sync'
     Do not invoke the `sync' system call before getting any usage data.
     This may make `df' run significantly faster on systems with many
     disks, but on some systems (notably SunOS) the results may be
     slightly out of date.  This is the default.

`-P'
`--portability'
     Use the POSIX output format.  This is like the default format
     except that the information about each filesystem is always
     printed on exactly one line; a mount device is never put on a line
     by itself.  This means that if the mount device name is more than
     20 characters long (e.g., for some network mounts), the columns
     are misaligned.

`--sync'
     Invoke the `sync' system call before getting any usage data.  On
     some systems (notably SunOS), doing this yields more up to date
     results, but in general this option makes `df' much slower,
     especially when there are many or very busy filesystems.

`-t FSTYPE'
`--type=FSTYPE'
     Limit the listing to filesystems of type FSTYPE.  Multiple
     filesystem types can be specified by giving multiple `-t' options.
     By default, nothing is omitted.

`-T'
`--print-type'
     Print each filesystem's type.  The types printed here are the same
     ones you can include or exclude with `-t' and `-x'.  The particular
     types printed are whatever is supported by the system.  Here are
     some of the common names (this list is certainly not exhaustive):

    `nfs'
          An NFS filesystem, i.e., one mounted over a network from
          another machine.  This is the one type name which seems to be
          used uniformly by all systems.

    `4.2, ufs, efs...'
          A filesystem on a locally-mounted hard disk.  (The system
          might even support more than one type here; Linux does.)

    `hsfs, cdfs'
          A filesystem on a CD-ROM drive.  HP-UX uses `cdfs', most other
          systems use `hsfs' (`hs' for `High Sierra').

    `pcfs'
          An MS-DOS filesystem, usually on a diskette.

`-x FSTYPE'
`--exclude-type=FSTYPE'
     Limit the listing to filesystems not of type FSTYPE.  Multiple
     filesystem types can be eliminated by giving multiple `-x'
     options.  By default, no filesystem types are omitted.

`-v'
     Ignored; for compatibility with System V versions of `df'.

DESCRIPTION
If an argument FILE is a disk device file containing a mounted filesystem, `df' shows the space available on that filesystem rather than on the filesystem containing the device node (i.e., the root filesystem). GNU `df' does not attempt to determine the disk usage on unmounted filesystems, because on most kinds of systems doing so requires extremely nonportable intimate knowledge of filesystem structures.


Related commands
:

du - Estimate file space usage

quot(1M), tunefs(1M), mnttab(4), attributes(5)


Equivalent Windows NT commands:

DIR - Display a list of files and folders
DIRUSE - resource kit utility to show size of multiple subfolders.
Click My Computer|Properties.



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Simon Sheppard
SS64.com